Persuasion in advertising essay

As usual, the media (and thereby the public) paid attention only to the sensational original story, and the scant coverage given to Vicary’s later confession was ignored or quickly forgotten. Radio and television stations began airing subliminal commercials, leading to two congressional bills to ban the practice being introduced in 1958 and 1959 (both of which died before being voted upon). In 1973, Dr. Wilson B. Key picked up where Vicary left off, publishing Subliminal Seduction , an indictment of modern advertisements filled with hidden messages and secret symbols — messages and symbols that only Dr. Key could discern (including the notorious example of the word “S-E-X” spelled out in the ice cubes pictured in a liquor advertisement). The old “subliminal advertising” controversy was stirred up again by Dr. Key’s book, leading to the 24 January 1974 announcement by the FCC that subliminal techniques, “whether effective or not,” were “contrary to the public interest,” and that any station employing them risked losing its broadcast license.

Persuasion in advertising essay

persuasion in advertising essay

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